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Types of Contact Lenses
We often are one of the first to receive the latest in Contact Lenses!
We also offer only the best in contact lens technology to provide
you with optimal vision, comfort and health

We have contacts available to target specific eye problems like dry eyes, astigmatism, difficulty reading, and eye diseases like keratoconus. We are focused on taking the time to give you the best comfort and vision, not just adequate comfort and vision. Contact lenses are constantly being improved for more comfort and better vision.

What are the different types of Contact Lenses?
Soft Contact Lenses
Soft contact lenses are made of soft, flexible plastics that allow oxygen to pass through to the cornea. Soft contact lenses may be easier to adjust to and are more comfortable than rigid gas permeable lenses. Newer soft lens materials include silicone-hydrogels to provide more oxygen to your eye while you wear your lenses.
 
Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) Contact Lenses
Rigid gas permeable contact lenses (RGPs) are more durable and resistant to deposit buildup. They tend to be less expensive over the life of the lens since they last longer than soft contact lenses. They are easier to handle and less likely to tear. However, they are not as comfortable initially as soft contacts and it may take a few weeks to get used to wearing RGPs, compared to several days for soft contacts.
 
Disposable (Replacement Schedule) Contact Lenses
The majority of soft contact lens wearers are prescribed some type of frequent replacement schedule. "Disposable," as defined by the FDA, means used once and discarded. With a true daily wear disposable schedule, a brand new pair of lenses is used each day. Some soft contact lenses are referred to as "disposable" by contact lens sellers, but actually, they are for frequent/planned replacement. With extended wear lenses, the lenses may be worn continuously for the prescribed wearing period (for example, 7 days to 30 days) and then thrown away. When you remove your lenses, make sure to clean and disinfect them properly before reinserting.
 
Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses
Some contact lenses do not correct vision and are intended solely to change the appearance of the eye. These are sometimes called plano, zero-powered or non-corrective lenses. For example, they can temporarily change a brown-eyed person's eye color to blue, or make a person's eyes look weird by portraying Halloween themes. Even though these decorative lenses don't correct vision, they're regulated by the FDA, just like corrective contact lenses.
Scleral Contact Lenses
Scleral lenses are larger lenses made of gas permeable material used to correct vision in a number of conditions such as keratoconus, post-refractive surgery corneal issues, ocular surface disease, dry eye, and even normal refractive errors.
 
Prosthetic Contact Lenses
Prosthetic lenses are used to achieve an improved cosmetic appearance when an eye has a misshaped pupil. If two eyes appear different due to a pupil irregularity, prosthetic lenses can be designed to match the iris of the other eye.
 
1849 Green Bay Road, Suite 165 Highland Park, IL 60035
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Dr. Christine Zeifert 1849 Green Bay Rd #165 Highland Park, IL 60035 Phone: (847) 780-3806

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